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Mother, son found dead at mobile home fire were shot, officials say

Details are being released in an explosion and fire that left a mother and son dead Friday afternoon, according to a release from the Adams County Sheriff’s Office. Deputies were called to 931A East Trout Valley Road in the town of Big Flats at 1:48 p.m. for a report of explosions and a structure fire. Emergency responders said the mobile home was engulfed in flames when they arrived. Frank Krueger, 62, lived in the mobile home with his 92-year-old mother, officials said. Krueger reportedly set fire to the mobile home, vehicle, camper and several out buildings on the property, investigators said. Emergency crews found Krueger outside the mobile home with a self-inflicted gunshot wound, and he later died, A woman's body found in the mobile home is believed to be that of Krueger’s mother, but positive identification is still pending, according to the release. An autopsy shows the woman was shot, but the exact cause of her death is still under investigation. The incident remains under investigation, but officials said there is no threat to the community related to the incident.

Published: Mon, 03 Aug 2015 21:45:45 GMT

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Published: Tue, 10 May 2011 13:51:57 GMT

Janesville man mistaken for dentist who killed Cecil the lion

A Janesville dentist is having to defend his honor after being mistaken for a Minnesota dentist accused of illegally killing a beloved African lion. Dr. Walter Palmer is the Eden Prairie dentist who has been in hiding since being accused of killing Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe. Unfortunately for Dr. Matt Palmer in Janesville, the Internet is ripe for misinformation. "He's in hiding so I'm assuming that maybe since they couldn't find the real Dr. Palmer I'm the alternate Walter, or the 'Walternate'," Matt Palmer said. The Janesville dentist said he had to change his number because of harassing phone calls that started in the middle of the night last week and spilled over into the following days. "I was signed up for robo-calls called 'cat facts,'" Palmer said. "I'd answer the phone and get a fact about cats given to me every hour." Ultimately he had to post a message on his office Facebook page to stop the online harassment. His dentistry partner is still getting calls, as his number was also posted online. "There's a lot of ignorant people I think," Palmer said. "Social media is great, but people are so quick to judge and to think that this is the guy and they don't have their facts straight." Palmer said he doesn't even hunt. "I've got a big family, I'm one of nine kids, and they are all hunters," Palmer said. "I'm the only one, I just don't hunt." While Palmer has taken the lion's share of the criticism in stride, he's got one real message for the messengers who've contacted him. "Be kinder, be nice," Palmer said. "I don't agree with Dr. Walter Palmer and what he did. I don't like big game hunting for sport and there's no reason for it. But before you click send, make sure you know what you're doing and saying and how it is going to affect somebody's life. We just have to be better to each other."

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 01:41:16 GMT

Packers TE Quarless deals with personal tragedy

Green Bay Packers tight end Andrew Quarless revealed Monday he missed the first two days of training camp because his daughter died at birth last week. Quarless had initially been excused from the first practice of camp on Thursday for what coach Mike McCarthy termed "a positive personal situation." The coach's tone changed ominously the following day when Quarless was again absent, saying the sixth-year tight end was dealing with "a very difficult family situation." On Monday, after fully participating in his first practice of camp, Quarless shared the devastating news and acknowledged that returning to football had been something of a safe haven. Quarless had taken part on a limited basis in Saturday's practice before players had Sunday off. He struggled at times to keep his emotions in check as he spoke Monday after several family members, including his 5-year-old son, watched practice. ___ AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

Published: Mon, 03 Aug 2015 21:30:36 GMT

Illinois beats Wisconsin on list of top party schools in the US

The University of Illinois has partied its way into the top spot on an annual list of top party schools in the country. The Urbana-Champaign campus has been among the top five on the Princeton Review's annual list for years but earned its first No. 1 ranking on the new list released Monday. One student surveyed noted that "drinking culture is huge here" in the 2016 edition of the review, which chronicles student life on 380 top U.S. universities. University spokeswoman Robin Kaler questioned the basis for the ranking and said it obscures the school's academic achievements. University of Wisconsin-Madison ranked No. 3 this year, with the University of Iowa coming in at No. 2. The top five is rounded out with Bucknell University at No. 4 and Syracuse University at No. 5. Last year's No. 1 party school, Syracuse University, in New York, dropped to No. 5. The most sober school? Brigham Young University for the 18th straight year.

Published: Mon, 03 Aug 2015 19:41:24 GMT

Batboy struck during baseball game dies

A beloved 9-year-old batboy for a summer collegiate baseball team died Sunday, one day after he was struck in the head with a bat. Kaiser Carlile idolized the Liberal Bee Jays from Liberal, Kansas. During the team's National Baseball Congress World Series game Saturday night, he was accidentally hit by a player's bat. "With the permission of the family, and with much sorrow and a very broken heart, I regretfully inform everyone that Kaiser Carlile passed away earlier this evening," team president Nathan McCaffrey said in a statement Sunday night. For many of the Bee Jays, Kaiser's death was deeply personal. "Kaiser, you were a little brother I never had," Kadon Simmons said. "You took the field with us every game this summer. You were, and always will be a Bee Jay. No person or team could ask for a better bat boy. It is terrible to see you leave in such a way, but knowing your last moments were on the baseball field makes it easier through this whole process, because you were doing what you loved." "Pleasure being around this young man for a short time," Cale O'Donnell tweeted. "Heaven gained an angel today. Rest in Peace Kaiser." Kaiser was supposed to start the fourth grade at Sunflower Intermediate School this month, The Wichita Eagle columnist Bob Lutz wrote. One of the batters accidentally hit Kaiser during a warmup swing as the boy was retrieving a bat, McCaffrey said. The team president said he heard the bat hit with Kaiser, who was wearing a helmet, before he took a few steps back and fell. "Just to see him fall, that's what crushes you," he said. The Bee Jays continued their game against the San Diego Waves on Saturday night, winning 12-5 in 13 innings. They went on to play against the Haysville Aviators on Sunday night. "Liberal wins! Bee Jays defeat Haysville 8-0! That's for you KC!" the team tweeted.

Published: Mon, 03 Aug 2015 12:19:55 GMT

Man gets jail for thrill killing of 15 deer

A 19-year-old Wisconsin man who authorities say took part in the "thrill killing" of 15 deer last year has been sentenced to six months in jail. Oshkosh Northwestern Media  reports Grant Boese of Ripon pleaded no contest in Green Lake County court Monday to six counts of failing to obtain a deer hunting license. A judge also sentenced him to three years of probation, and ordered he lose his hunting privileges for 12 years. A plea agreement with prosecutors resulted in 122 other counts against Boese being dropped. Court documents said Boese's deer kills included shooting 11 deer from the passenger seat of a vehicle in late November. A complaint says Boese and two other men led law enforcement on a chase on Nov. 29 before getting stuck in a marshy field in the town of Princeton.

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:21:22 GMT

Walker personal finances: more liabilities than assets

Republican presidential hopeful Scott Walker often talks about shopping at discount stores. Now we know why. The Wisconsin governor's personal financial liabilities far outweigh his assets. That's according to filings released Monday by the Federal Election Commission, revealing he's one of the least wealthy candidates in the 2016 race. Walker reported personal assets between $36,000 and $190,000 -- made up mostly of his life insurance and a government deferred compensation plan. The forms offer broad ranges, making it impossible to detail his exact worth. Walker owes between $120,000 as $280,000, largely because of student loan debt for his children that could be as high as $250,000. He lists no property in the forms. He lists a governor's salary of $222,899 and reported a $45,000 advance payment for his recent book.

Published: Mon, 03 Aug 2015 23:02:39 GMT

Pit bull attacks, kills Yorkshire terrier, woman says

A small dog was killed Sunday night after the owner said it was attacked by a pit bull. Rebecca Lulling owned a small Yorkshire terrier named Millie. Lulling said Millie got out of the house Sunday night as the pit bull was being walked nearby. Millie went over to the pit bull and was attacked, Lulling said. She said the pit bull was on a leash, but the owner could not control it. Lulling said the pit bull’s owners don’t’ think they did anything wrong because Millie wasn’t leashed. Lulling said she not only fears for the safety of her dogs, but also her kids. The owner of the pit bull got a $187 citation, was given a letter saying the dog is a dangerous animal and has been ordered to spay the do

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:58:35 GMT

Schools compete for teachers as applications decrease

Thousands of teaching positions are still vacant in Wisconsin as schools deal with fewer applicants. Posted to the education job website WECAN just Monday were more than 2,000 teaching jobs – a number experts say is high for this close to the school year. In Portage, the school district has hired 32 full-time teaching positions in the past few months, with four more still to go before September. “We've had a significant decrease in the number of people we see applying for positions,” says District Administrator Charles Poches. “A few years ago, we’d have a posting that may garner up to 150 applications for one position.” That number this year? “Anywhere from 30 to 50,” he says. On the University of Wisconsin campus, the School of Education’s Career Center is serving fewer future teachers, but more schools. “We are definitely seeing some decline in that field,” says director Charlene Walker. “[But] our attendance at career fairs from the school districts is very high. “They’re definitely competing for the talent.” Some, not all Walker says while there is undoubtedly a shortage in teacher applicants, some fields are hurting worse than others.  “Elementary [teachers] tend to still be closer to matching the demand in terms of the supply, [while] you're going to find more shortages of math, science and world language teachers,” she says. Colleges and universities are facing a lesser shortage than primary schools. School district location also factors into a teacher’s decision where to work, Walker added. What's to blame? Walker point to a changing landscape – in more ways than one. “I think the economy is better – so there aren’t as many people going into the field,” Walker says. “If they had the choice to make and education was just one of their options, they might not be going there.” Act 10 may also be having an impact on the profession, according to Walker. “Act 10 has created a new environment for teachers [as well as for] HR directors… and they’re really just beginning to see what’s going to happen as a result, as their negotiated agreements are coming to an end.” Other factors come into play, as well. “I think there’s just concern in what’s going on with the environment, how many more tests they have to take, what's expected of them to do in the classroom, and do they have time and ability to do teaching - which is why they went into the field – or are they just doing more management and testing?”

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 03:28:48 GMT

Walker calls on Wisconsin attorney general to take action

Gov. Scott Walker has asked Wisconsin's attorney general to take "immediate action" to protect ratepayers and workers from what the Republican presidential candidate calls "devastating impacts" of a new rule designed to cut greenhouse gases. Walker said in a statement Monday that the final rule released by President Barack Obama oversteps the limits of his authority to pursue a political agenda. Walker referred to a Wisconsin Public Service Commission estimate that the new rules would cost the state's ratepayers up to $13 billion. A spokeswoman for Attorney General Brad Schimel did not immediately return a message seeking comment on what steps he would take. Wisconsin was part of a 15-state lawsuit rejected in June by a federal appeals court that challenged the preliminary rules.

Published: Mon, 03 Aug 2015 20:17:10 GMT

Burglary suspect tells police he was ?chilling? in area

A Madison man arrested Friday on multiple charges told police he was in the area “chilling,” according to a release. Brice C. Walker, 33, was arrested outside an apartment building in the 1800 block of South Whitney Way around 8:05 a.m. after a resident reported seeing him coming from the laundry room, officials said. Officers said washers and dryers in the apartment building had been damaged, and there were quarters all over the floor. Walker, who has past burglary convictions, was arrested on tentative charges of burglary, possession of burglary tools, damage to property and on a parole violation.

Published: Mon, 03 Aug 2015 19:24:48 GMT

VA hospital wait times longer despite staff additions

Officials said wait times at Madison's Veterans Hospital have increased despite additional staff, extended hours and more care options. Chief of staff Alan Bridges said the longer waits for care can be attributed to increased demand. The hospital has handled more than 4,200 appointments so far this year — a 2 percent increase over the same period last year. The State Journal reported VA officials in Madison said the average wait for all primary care visits is about 3½ days, up from approximately 1½ days a year ago. The wait is a little longer for specialty care — nearly four days. The Madison hospital wait times are better than the national average. At the VA hospitals in Tomah and Milwaukee, primary care waits are shorter, but the wait for specialty care is longer.

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 12:11:48 GMT

Officials ID 2 killed in crash at intersection with obscured stop sign

Two people were killed and three were injured, including a 4-year-old, in a crash where deputies said a stop sign was obscured at Rock County intersection. Rock County sheriff’s deputies were sent to the intersection of West County Road C and North Pleasant Prairie Road in the town of Union for a report of a two-vehicle crash just before 6 p.m., according to a release. Kay Ellen Coleman, 53, of Madison was driving a 2011 Dodge Charger north on North Pleasant Prairie when she did not stop at a stop sign, officials said. The Charger was T-boned by a 2013 Dodge Avenger, being driven by a 24-year-old Brooklyn woman, at the intersection. The 24-year-old Brooklyn woman and her 4-year-old daughter were transported to UW Hospital by Med Flight for non-life-threatening injuries, according to the release. The woman and her daughter were wearing seat belts at the time of the crash. Coleman and a passenger, 46-year-old Michael D. Crotty, 46, of Evansville, were pronounced dead at the scene, officials said. Coleman's husband, a 60-year-old Madison man, was transported to Mercy Hospital and Trauma Center in Janesville with non-life-threatening injuries. Investigators said the three occupants of the Dodge Avenger were wearing their seat belts. Speed and alcohol are not believed to be factors in the crash, but investigators said the stop sign at the intersection was obscured by foliage in a wooded tree line. There was also high corn on the opposite side, making the intersection difficult to see, officials said. The intersection was closed about three-and-a-half hours during the investigation, according to the release. At this time, authorities do not expect to file charges in the incident.

Published: Sun, 02 Aug 2015 21:49:13 GMT

GOP hopefuls take on illegal immigration in debate preview

The Republican Party's presidential class demanded aggressive steps to curb illegal immigration, seizing on a delicate political issue while facing off in New Hampshire on Monday night during a crowded and pointed preview of the 2016 primary season's first full-fledged debate. All but three of the 17 major Republican candidates for president participated in what was essentially a debate lite, which — unlike Thursday's nationally televised debate in Cleveland — didn't have a cut-off for participation. Without exception, the candidates aimed their criticism at Democrats instead of each other in a two-hour meeting where they had more in common than not. Not mentioned was the candidate making the most news headed into Thursday's debate: Donald Trump. The billionaire businessman declined to participate in Monday's gathering, but is poised to take center stage later in the week. Monday's meeting offered a prime-time practice round for the GOP's most ambitious, appearing on stage one at a time, who addressed several contentious issues, immigration topping a list that also included abortion and climate change. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who may not qualify for the upcoming debate as one of the GOP's top 10 candidates in national polling, called the flow of immigrants crossing the border illegally "a serious wound." "You want to stanch the flow," he said as his Republican rivals watched from the front row of the crowded St. Anselm College auditorium. On those immigrants who have overstayed visas, Perry charged, "You go find 'em, you pick 'em up and you send 'em back where they're from." Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum went further, calling for a 25 percent reduction of low-skilled immigrants coming into the country legally. "Everyone else is dancing around it. I'm going to stand for the American worker," Santorum declared. Monday's participants included seven current or former governors, four senators, a businesswoman, a retired neurosurgeon and one former senator. Trump, who launched his presidential bid by calling Mexican immigrants rapists and criminals, was among only three major candidates who didn't participate. Monday's event was broadcast live on C-SPAN and local television stations in Iowa and South Carolina — states that, along with New Hampshire, will host the first contests in the presidential primary calendar next February. Just an hour before the forum began, the Senate blocked a GOP-backed bill to strip funding from Planned Parenthood, reviving a debate on social issues that some Republican officials hoped to avoid in 2016. Three of the four senators participating in Monday's event —Marco Rubio of Florida, Ted Cruz of Texas and Rand Paul of Kentucky — did so via satellite from C-SPAN's Washington studio so they wouldn't miss the high-profile vote. "We had to be here to vote to de-fund Planned Parenthood," Cruz said. It's a welcome debate for Democrats who see women — married women, particularly — as a key constituency in 2016. Leading Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, who would be the nation's first female president, lashed out at the attacks on Planned Parenthood in a web video released before the GOP forum. "If this feels like a full-on assault for women's health, that's because it is," Clinton said in the video, criticizing by name former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Perry. Democrats are also eager to debate Republicans on immigration. GOP leaders have acknowledged the need to improve the party's standing among Hispanic voters. Yet while many Democrats favor a more forgiving policy that would allow immigrants in the country illegally a pathway to citizenship, most Republicans in the field instead focus on border security. Rubio, once a lead salesman for a comprehensive immigration overhaul, said Americans want the border fence completed and more border security agents before there's any discussion of what to do with those 11 million immigrants in the country illegally. Others offered a softer tone. Ohio Gov. John Kasich said "law-abiding, God-fearing" immigrants should be allowed to stay. Those who break the law, he said, "have to be deported or put in prison." Bush said fixing the nation's immigration system is a key part of his plan to help the economy grow 4 percent each year. He also called for reducing legal immigration, particularly the number of people allowed to enter the country to rejoin family. President Barack Obama injected another contentious issue Monday when he unveiled new emissions limits on power plants designed to address climate change. He called it a moral obligation and warned anew that climate change will threaten future generations if left unchecked. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker called the move "a buzz saw to the nation's economy." "I want to balance a sustainable environment with a sustainable economy," Walker said. Several candidates involved Monday night won't make the cut for Thursday's debate. Those on the bubble include South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham and former technology executive Carly Fiorina, who charged that Clinton has repeatedly lied during investigations into her use of a private email server and an attack on an American embassy in Libya while she was secretary of state. "These go to the core of her character," Fiorina said. After the debate, Kasich was asked about Trump's absence. "I never thought about him," the Ohio governor said. "It'd have been great if he'd have been here."

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:48:24 GMT

VA hospital wait times longer despite staff additions

Officials said wait times at Madison's Veterans Hospital have increased despite additional staff, extended hours and more care options. Chief of staff Alan Bridges said the longer waits for care can be attributed to increased demand. The hospital has handled more than 4,200 appointments so far this year — a 2 percent increase over the same period last year. The State Journal reported VA officials in Madison said the average wait for all primary care visits is about 3½ days, up from approximately 1½ days a year ago. The wait is a little longer for specialty care — nearly four days. The Madison hospital wait times are better than the national average. At the VA hospitals in Tomah and Milwaukee, primary care waits are shorter, but the wait for specialty care is longer.

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 12:11:48 GMT

Judge: Man charged in wife's death, standoff fit for trial

A judge has deemed a 58-year-old man competent to stand trial in the fatal shooting of his wife and subsequent four-hour standoff with police in central Wisconsin. The Stevens Point Journal  reports Larry Sanchez is accused of killing his wife, Lisa, on June 3 in Bancroft. He was found fit for trial Monday during a hearing in Portage County court. Sanchez said in the hearing that he wasn't fit for trial when asked by the judge. A clinical psychologist who interviewed Sanchez testified that he understood the case and charges against him, though he had a difficult time focusing. Charges against Sanchez include first-degree intentional homicide and homicide by intoxicated use of a weapon. He is being held on $1 million bond. ___ Information from: Stevens Point Journal Media, http://www.stevenspointjournal.com

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:37:53 GMT

What you need to know: Tuesday

It's Tuesday, August 4 and here is your day ahead: Want to get a push alert when we publish "What You Need to Know" each day? Sign up on our app. In local news... WEATHER: Today will be mostly sunny and pleasant with highs near 80 degrees. Full forecast  1. SCHOOLS Teachers needed: Thousands of teaching positions are still vacant in Wisconsin as schools deal with fewer applicants. Posted to the education job website WECAN just Monday were more than 2,000 teaching jobs – a number experts say is high for this close to the school year. Portage schools have seen a drop in just the number of applicants for jobs, from around 150 a few years ago, to between 30 to 50 this year. Experts believe the economy and overall teaching environment may be contributing factors. More on this story 2. CECIL THE LION ?Mistaken identity: A Janesville dentist is having to defend his honor after being mistaken for a Minnesota dentist accused of illegally killing a beloved African lion. Dr. Walter Palmer is the Eden Prairie dentist who has been in hiding since being accused of killing Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe. Unfortunately for Dr. Mat Palmer in Janesville, the Internet is ripe for misinformation. The Janesville dentist said he had to change his number because of harassing phone calls that started in the middle of the night last week and spilled over into the following days. More on this story 3. ANDREW QUARLESS Personal tragedy: Many were wondering why Green Bay Packers tight end Andrew Quarless missed the first two days of training camp. He revealed yesterday that last week his daughter died at birth. Quarless had initially been excused from the first practice of camp on Thursday for what coach Mike McCarthy termed "a positive personal situation." The coach's tone changed ominously the following day when Quarless was again absent, saying the sixth-year tight end was dealing with "a very difficult family situation." More on this story 4. DOMINIQUE WILKINS NBA All-Star in Madison: Just a year after retiring from professional basketball, legendary former Atlanta Hawks guard Dominique Wilkins was diagnosed with the disease that took his father's and grandfather's lives - Type 2 Diabetes. Today, Wilkins is stopping in Madison to talk about how he maintains a healthy lifestyle while living with Type 2 Diabetes. Wilkins will talk with area families at the Taft Street Boys and Girls club, and help celebrate the opening of the newly renovated fitness center. 5. UW-MADISON Party schools: The University of Wisconsin-Madison ranks No. 3 on this year's annual list of top party schools in the country. The University of Illinois partied its way into the top spot on the Princeton Review's annual list for years but earned its first No. 1 ranking on the new list released Monday. The most sober school? Brigham Young University for the 18th straight year. More on this story In national news... 1. CIRCUS TENT COLLAPSE Circus tragedy: A circus tent collapsed during stormy weather in New Hampshire yesterday, killing two people. Their names weren't released, but officials described them as a "young man and a young girl." About 100 people were inside the tent at the time, watching a performance of the Walker Brothers Circus. At least 27 people were hospitalized. More on this story 2. CAMPAIGN 2016 Forum fun: Consider it a debate preview. Fourteen of the 17 GOP presidential contenders were on stage last night for a candidates' forum, in advance of Thursday's night big debate. Each candidate answered questions in a one-on-one format with a moderator. It was a pretty tame two hours, probably because the current GOP frontrunner -- Donald Trump -- wasn't there. More on this story 3. PLANNED PARENTHOOD Funding fight: A Senate vote to defund Planned Parenthood failed yesterday, setting up the possibility the GOP will use a government shutdown threat to strip the nonprofit group's funding. Federal agencies run out of money at the end of September, and Congress is expected to take up some type of short-term spending bill next month. Pressure will be high in conservative circles to attach a provision to any federal spending bill to block additional funds for Planned Parenthood. More on this story 4. CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES Fiery figures: Twenty-one fires. 134,000 acres burned. 10,000 firefighters deployed. And tens of thousands of residents evacuated. That's the tale of the numbers out of California this morning, as the state struggles with another day of multiple wildfires. The largest blaze is the Rocky Fire, which has burned 60,000, drought-parched acres in three counties. It's only 12% contained, so it's going to be awhile before it's under control. More on this story 5. DARREN WILSON Police profile: As the anniversary of the Michael Brown shooting approaches, Darren Wilson -- the former Ferguson, Missouri, police officer who killed Brown -- has re-emerged, at least in the pages of The New Yorker. The magazine paints Wilson as a reclusive man leading a "very quiet life" with his family. Check out six other things we learned about Wilson from the profile. More on this story

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 13:11:43 GMT

2 injured in crash that pushes SUV into oncoming traffic, officials say

Two people were injured in a rear-end crash that pushed one of the vehicles into oncoming traffic Monday morning, officials said. Dane County sheriff’s deputies responded to a three-vehicle crash in the town of Deerfield just after 7:30 a.m., according to a release. Emily Olson, 29, of Cottage Grove, was driving east on Highway 12 in her 2014 GMC Terrain and tried to make a left turn onto Oak Park Road, officials said. While waiting to turn, Tammy J. Reichert, 31, of Deerfield, rear-ended Olson with her Econoline van, according to the release. The crash pushed Olson’s SUV into the westbound lane where her vehicle was hit by a 2003 Dodge Ram pick-up, being driven by 40-year-old Dewi Jingga, of Cambridge, investigators said. Reichert and Jingga were transported with non-life-threatening injuries, according to the release. Reichert was cited for following too close.

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 03:13:57 GMT

MFD: Sparks from welding torch start fire at metal recycling center

Sparks from a welding torch reportedly started a fire in an industrial metal shredder Monday morning, officials said. The Madison Fire Department was called to Alter Metal Recycling at 4400 Sycamore Avenue around 10:45 a.m. for reports of a commercial fire, according to a release. Crews arriving on scene could see smoking coming from the second and third levels of the industrial recycling shredder, and they found that a vehicle inside the shredder was on fire, officials said. Crews put out the fire in less than an hour, according to the release. Investigators said the fire was caused by sparks from a welding torch used in the area just before the incident. No one was injured. Officials did not release an estimate of damage. VIDEO

Published: Tue, 04 Aug 2015 02:24:53 GMT